Gaze.Dream.Believe

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archatlas:

Sustainability Treehouse Mithun

"The Sustainability Treehouse, a Living Building Challenge targeted interpretive and gathering facility situated in the forest at the Summit Bechtel Reserve, serves as a unique icon of camp adventure, environmental stewardship and innovative building design. Mithun led the integrated design process and a multidisciplinary team to achieve the engaging, high-performance facility."

(via currentboat)

537 notes

scissorsandthread:

Hair Chain Braid | A Beautiful Mess
I never would usually encourage y’all to tie your hair into knots but when it looks this pretty, why wouldn’t you!? This is a pretty twist (haha, pun!) on the traditional French braid and should work on most hair lengths (unless your hair is super short). Just don’t pull those knots too tight, I don’t want you to have to cut it off!

scissorsandthread:

Hair Chain Braid | A Beautiful Mess

I never would usually encourage y’all to tie your hair into knots but when it looks this pretty, why wouldn’t you!? This is a pretty twist (haha, pun!) on the traditional French braid and should work on most hair lengths (unless your hair is super short). Just don’t pull those knots too tight, I don’t want you to have to cut it off!

2,354 notes

I wanna go

instagram:

Inside Ruby Falls, Tennessee’s Underground Waterfall

For more photos and videos from the falls, explore the Ruby Falls location page.

341 meters (1,120 feet) beneath Lookout Mountain in Chattanooga, Tennessee, an underground stream winds its way through the caverns before plummeting to depths below. This site, known as Ruby Falls, has become one of the most famous tourist spots in the southeast United States, drawing visitors to capture the sight of the falls.

The caves of Lookout Mountain have a rich and storied history leading up through the 19th century, but in 1905 railway construction along the mountain shut off all access to the caverns, leaving it inaccessible to visitors. Inspired by the stories of the past, cave enthusiast Leo Lambert garnered resources to reopen the site by constructing an elevator shaft down into the cavern, and in 1928 construction on his project commenced. In excavating the shaft, however, Lambert discovered a new section of the cavern and—at its end—the waterfall.

Lambert named the falls after his wife, Ruby, and went on to develop the site into a destination for visitors with regular tours and Cavern Castle, an elaborate above-ground reception center. In time, Ruby Falls also came to be one of the first caves outfitted with electric lights. Now, colored lights illuminate the falls, making it an even more attractive destination for visiting Instagrammers.

290 notes

#lighting

worclip:

Dune House (2011) by JVA and Mole Architects Ltd.

Primary Architects: Einar Jarmund, Håkon Vignæs, Alessandra Kosberg, and Anders Granli
Engineer: Jane Wernick Associates

Location: Thorpeness, Suffolk, England

To get a planning permission it was important to relate to the existing, typical, British seaside strip of houses. The roofscape, the bedroom floor, somehow plays with the formal presence of these buildings, and also brings into mind a romantic remembrance of holidays at bed- and breakfasts while traveling through the UK.

The ground floor contrasts this by its lack of relationship to the architecture of the top floor. The living area and the terraces are set into the dunes in order to protect it form the strong winds, and opens equally in all directions to allow for wide views. The corners can be opened by sliding doors; this will emphasize the floating appearance of the top floor.

(via currentboat)